Use Of Keyword Revealer In SEO

Understand the intent behind the keywords to improve your conversion

It is repeated over and over again, SEO is the art of identifying the right keywords and “working” on the pages of its website. But what is a good keyword? The common answer, rebuttal: a query (a word, an expression) that the people we target type in Google, which has both a good search volume and a reasonable or weak competition.

This is a partial answer, and false because partial, which reveals a rather poor conception of SEO. Behind the keywords, there are the intentions. And they are the ones who matter. It is from them that we must go. What you target are not keywords, they are netizens with well-identified intentions. The keywords are a resultant. They only express an intention.

We will see why it is essential to be interested in the intentions hidden behind the famous “keywords”, why it is the best mindset to have if one became a SEO pro. Far from us the idea of ​​ejecting the “keywords” of SEO thinking. The purpose of this article is just to invite you to take a step back on them … to find the right ones and improve your organic traffic.

If you want to take a new turn in your SEO strategy, adopt new approaches, evolve your way of working your SEO, this article is yours. If you want to do SEO in a really smart and stimulating way, this article is for you.

Understand the intent behind the keywords to improve your conversion

It is repeated over and over again, SEO is the art of identifying the right keywords and “working” on the pages of its website. But what is a good keyword? The common answer, rebuttal: a query (a word, an expression) that the people we target type in Google, which has both a good search volume and a reasonable or weak competition.

This is a partial answer, and false because partial, which reveals a rather poor conception of SEO. Behind the keywords, there are the intentions. And they are the ones who matter. It is from them that we must go. What you target are not keywords, they are netizens with well-identified intentions. The keywords are a resultant. They only express an intention.

We will see why it is essential to be interested in the intentions hidden behind the famous “keywords”, why it is the best mindset to have if one became a SEO pro. Far from us the idea of ​​ejecting the “keywords” of SEO thinking. The purpose of this article is just to invite you to take a step back on them … to find the right ones and improve your organic traffic.

If you want to take a new turn in your SEO strategy, adopt new approaches, evolve your way of working your SEO, this article is yours. If you want to do SEO in a really smart and stimulating way, this article is for you.

Summary

The 4 main intentions hidden behind the keywords?
How to identify revealing keywords of an intention?
How to organize keywords to improve conversion?
The 4 main intentions hidden behind the keywords?

When a user types a questions into Google, he has an intention. He does it for a specific reason. What do we look for when we type a query in Google? What is the mindset of the user who types in a search engine? There are 4 main possible intentions, four psychological dispositions:

# 1 A commercial intention
When a person types “buy sneakers,” you would not take much risk by betting that she intends to buy a pair of sneakers. Likewise, a person who types “free delivery washing machine” into his search bar will most likely intend to buy a washing machine. Google queries that contain words like “buy”, “promotions”, “bargains”, “special offer”, “free delivery”, “discount code” are typically queries that reveal a strong intention to purchase the part of the Internet users.

# 2 An informational intention
A search engine also serves, quite simply, to search for information, to find information, to find answers to the questions that one asks oneself. Before being in a buyer’s state of mind, Internet users seek information about products and services. These netizens “researchers” are not a priori not ready to buy. They are not (yet) in this provision. At the moment, they are buyers. It would not be a good idea, probably, to try to sell things to them. It is too early. They are not advanced enough in their buying process, they are at the “awereness” stage of their “buyer journey” as the Anglo-Saxons say.

People looking for information on the internet use queries like:

How…
Why…
Best ways to …
What does it mean ?
These are people who are questioning and do not yet know very well what product, what service could meet their needs, their challenges, their needs. If you target these kinds of queries, and therefore the Internet users in search of information, do not try to land them on landing pages on which you want to sell them products. They are not in this perspective. You would type hard, but beside. However, you can offer them quality informative content to develop their interest in your brand, offer them to download a white paper to collect their email addresses …

Be aware, the vast majority of search engine queries are made by people looking for information. Google is used first to search for information.

# 3 A “transactional” intention
Anglosaxons speak of “transactional intent”. In truth, it is quite difficult to translate this idea into French. Transactional intent lies somewhere between commercial intent and informational intent. The user plans to buy a product, he is ready to make his decision, but seeks advice and opinions to make a good choice. He has not made his decision yet. He needs to reassure himself before taking the plunge. He will certainly buy, because he has a real need to fill, a real challenge to overcome, or simply a desire (in B2C …). The person wants to buy but first wants to learn more.

Queries that reveal a transactional intent are of this type:

Notice …
Critical…
Best …
Top 10 …
… vs …
Etc.
# 4 The navigational queries
The navigational queries are the queries typed by people who want to learn about a specific brand, on a specific company. For example: “salesforce notice”. These requests are gold mines for companies. A user typing a query on the “[Company Name] + …” template is someone who, by definition, knows the business and knows exactly what they want.

With these kinds of queries, you need to make sure that:

Internet users who make these queries (those including the name of your company) will fall on the pages of your website in the search results.
Your website responds as effectively as possible to the questions surfers are asking.
For example, if a user types “sendinblue rates”, you must:

That the Sendinblue rates page is at the top of the Google results page.
That providing cheap rates Sendinblue really gives all the information that users can ask about Sendinblue’s rates.

How to identify revealing keywords of an intention?
In most cases, it is common sense to identify keywords that reveal an intention. In most cases, it is obvious whether a request is typed by someone who has a purchase intention or not. Someone who types “levis jeans history” probably does not intend to buy jeans, unlike the surfer who types “buy jean levis free delivery”. This is where we understand the importance of being interested in the intentions hidden behind the keywords. Because, in this case, the first request contains the key phrase “jean levis” … and yet it is not worth much from a basically commercial point of view … there is almost no chance that the person who type this query in Google buys one of your jeans.

For most queries, it is quite simple to define whether it reveals an intention to purchase, informational, transactional or “navigational” to use the terminology used (although a little barbaric …).

Google, to improve the relevance of its search engine, has been interested for more than 10 years in the intentions hidden behind the keywords. Today, he adapts his way of presenting the results according to the nature of the intention expressed in the research. For example, for a query with strong business intent, Google will first show Google Shopping results. So you only need to search Google to identify the intentions hidden behind the keywords. If the Google Shopping results appear at the top of the page on a given query, it’s likely that you’re dealing with a business intent on the part of the user.

Here are some examples of formats used by Google to display the results differently depending on the intentions:

The boxes located at the top of the results page, which give a simple answer to a simple question. When you type a keyword in Google and it shows you this kind of box at the top of the page, it’s an “informational” request.

How to organize keywords to improve conversion?
Interest in intentions should be an integral part of your keyword research. You must always keep in mind that you target people with specific intentions (buy, find out …) and not keywords! The keywords are only the revealers of intentions. Using this prism will help you improve the quality of your site content, customer satisfaction and conversion rates.

The first step is to organize key phrases by intent:

Keywords revealing an informational intention can give you ideas of content to produce on your site. The fact, for example, to look at the queries that appear in the box “Other questions asked” still allows to find plenty of ideas for articles to write.
The revealing keywords of a “transactional” intention also make it possible to find content ideas to write: product lists, comparative articles, an FAQ, tutorials, etc. These contents will improve your conversion tunnel.
For keywords revealing commercial intent, several actions are possible. You can improve your product pages to make them go up in Google. On this subject, discover our complete guide on the conception and the writing of the product sheets . You can also produce landing pages targeting the product or products you want to promote by working very specific keywords
“Navigation” keywords can reveal different types of intent. A strong commercial intention (for the “[company] + tariffs” requests for example) or, as is the case most often, a transactional intention: the user probably intends to buy a product or service of the company but needs additional information or advice before deciding.
You can then go further in the organization of keywords. Some keywords:

Can be used to create new content or new landing pages.
Can be used to enhance or update some existing pages.
Finally, last step, we advise you to organize your keywords by type of landing page. Attention by landing page we mean here the page to which is redirected (“lands”) a user who clicks on your link in the results of Google. When we say “type of landing page”, we must understand in practice “type of web page”. For informational or transactional requests, it is advisable to create pages of the type:

Blog posts: product lists, gift ideas, etc.
FAQ pages (especially if you have to do queries with navigation intent).
Glossaries (if you are in a sector with a lot of technical terms).
Etc.
You can then use Excel or Google Spreadsheets to organize all your keywords. by intent, by action to be deployed, by type of landing page. Convinceandconvert offers a Google Sheet pretty well done to achieve this. To access it, it’s here . The table is downloadable free of charge. It’s up to you, of course, to adapt it as you wish.

The choice of keywords is essential. Focusing on the motives behind any keyword makes it possible, in our opinion, to make more judicious keyword choices and to create pages, contents that better match the expectations, needs and objectives of your keywords. potential customers. Considering this aspect of things will undoubtedly allow you to take a step forward and improve your marketing strategy. And above all: to build a smarter, smarter SEO strategy.

 

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